A VIDEO
"Memories In The Rain"
A PHOTO

ganjflavoredcleats:

smidgetz:

il-tenore-regina:

wakefestatstiffanys:

selbstgerecht:

Students burn Mexican govt. building in protest over police corruption 

Hundreds of residents in a southern-Mexican city smashed up the state capital building in a furious protest over the continued lack of information about 43 local college students, believed to have been abducted by corrupt police. The local police are allegedly working with a powerful drug cartel and it’s feared that 10 newly discovered mass graves my contain the bodies of the students taken on September 26. “Up to 20” charred remains were discovered on Saturday. As an investigation is underway, 26 police officers have so far been arrested, a number of which admitted to working with the Guerreros Unidos - an infamous drug cartel. Arrest warrants have also been issued for the mayor of Iguala, Jose Luis Albarca, his wife and his security chief, but they have gone into hiding. 

Watch Video here

Read full story

holy fucking shit this is huge

Oh my God.

Burn it all down until they answer for everything.

Burn all corruption to the ground

There is also the petition for the destitution/resign of the governor of Guerrero Angel Aguirre (where this happened) http://tinyurl.com/klu5nl2 it’s in spanish, but it’ll help if you sign.

Ruben Figureoa (a previous governor of Guerrero) had to resign to the position of governor due to the massacre of 17 people in Aguas Blancas in 1995.

Reblogged from YES YES Y'ALL
A VIDEO

fruitasticharlotte:

sixpenceee:

sixpenceee:

Sir Nicholas Winton is a humanitarian who organized a rescue operation that saved the lives of 669 Jewish Czechoslovakia children from Nazi death camps, and brought them to the safety of Great Britain between the years 1938-1939.

After the war, his efforts remained unknown. But in 1988, Winton’s wife Grete found the scrapbook from 1939 with the complete list of children’s names and photos. Sir Nicholas Winton is sitting in an audience of Jewish Czechoslovakian people who he saved 50 years before.

WATCH FULL VIDEO HERE

This post gained more than 100,000 notes in over a day. One of the most powerful things I ever posted. 

This is one of the most beautiful things I have ever watched 

A PHOTO

livin-by-the-ws:

kaminas-spirit:

lolshtus:

Lions Save Kidnapped Girl

if lions are coming to rescue someone, you have to know what you’re doing is wrong. you know, in that moment before you’re torn in to tiny little pieces by said lions 

Even lions know rape is wrong

Reblogged from beautiful disaster
A TEXT POST

juilan:

Being mexican is fucking wild I love it

Reblogged from Stephan is the name
A PHOTO

thinkmexican:

Little Mystery to Iguala Mass Graves: Mexico’s Drug War Is Killing Children

By Laura Carlsen

Young people are now targeted by the very people sworn to protect them. If this isn’t the ultimate duplicity of abusive law enforcement, what is?

Image: Mexican soldier guards mass grave site in the outskirts of Iguala, Guerrero, where at least 28 burned bodies were discovered on Saturday, which authorities say could belong to 43 students who went missing in late September.

Many countries prohibit deploying their military for domestic law enforcement: it’s a recipe for violent authoritarian abuse.

But the Obama administration’s prohibitionist drug war is funding and encouraging abuse and brutal, corrupt, mass-grave-level murders throughout Mexico and Central America – enough that even drug-war apologists admit that the appalling increase in human-rights abuses are a result of sending the military and police into communities in the name of anti-trafficking.

In just nine years, the drug war waged by the US and Mexico has created a climate of violence that has claimed more than 100,000 lives throughout the country, many young people – including two horrific massacres and a mass disappearance in the last six months connected to law enforcement nominally tasked with battling the spread of drugs.

An ambush on 26 September, begun by uniformed local police and finished off by an armed commando, left six young people dead and 43 students missing, nearly half of whom were last seen in police custody. Others are battling for their lives in local hospitals (where the possibility of a new attack is considered so high that the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights ordered precautionary measures for the wounded and the missing). This week, 28 semi-burned bodies were discovered in a mass grave, which authorities say could be the bodies of the missing students. Politicians allied with cartels are blamed for the atrocity.

The mayor of Iguala, Guerrero, where the attacks took place, has gone into hiding, and the city’s head of security is charged with ordering the ambush. A state judge has charged 22 policemen with the crime and accused them of being hit men for the “Guerreros Unidos” gang.

This latest massacre followed the massacre of 22 young people in Tlatlaya, Mexico State, on 30 June in what was originally said to be a confrontation between the 102nd army battalion and a local gang. But evidence from eyewitnesses and forensics now indicates that the soldiers executed the kids, and eight army personnel are under indictment.

The collusion of government and organized crime is so frequent in Mexico that it forms part of the structure and operations of both in many parts of the country. And the lack of justice for crimes committed by members of this alliance is nothing new. But rarely – if ever – have so-called public servants so openly attacked civilians.

The dead and missing students in the latest massacre come from poor, farming families and attended the Ayotzinapa teacher-training college, which provides rural areas with needed teachers and young people with education and careers. The revolutionary-era schools are rooted in the government’s commitment to education and social equality, and continue to sustain the dreams of poor, often indigenous, young people to forge a better future for themselves, their families and their country. In the wake of economic reforms and the North American Free Trade Agreement (Nafta), though, the federal government has targeted the schools for elimination (and a clash between protesting students and the police in 2011 resulted in the death of two students).

Officials stated that the Guerreros Unidos gang was angry with those students for hurting their local businesses and used corrupt government authorities to teach them a lesson – but state actors also had reason to wipe out a focal point of resistance to unpopular national reforms and a school with a reputation as a protest leader. The earlier massacre seems to be the result of the extrajudicial execution of alleged “delinquents” in an operation resembling social cleansing. A recent report by the UN Special Rapporteur found “an alarmingly high rate” of summary executions of supposed cartel or gang members by Mexican security forces.

A nation that murders dissident or disaffected youth destroys its future.

Mexico’s young people have been targeted by the very people who are supposed to protect them at a moment in national history when their future is at stake. The government’s economic reforms, widely hailed as progress in the United States, puts the nation’s development and resources in the hands of a transnational private sector that does not exactly have a reputation for providing for the poor and disadvantaged.

Meanwhile, militarizing Mexico in the name of narcotics control has worked against the peace and democracy the US claims that it promotes. Not only has the drug war made the already-lucrative drug trade more violent by increasing competition among the cartels, it also has established a network of state-crime alliances that can – and are – being used for political purposes.

The war on drugs has never controlled drug trafficking and has always been about social control. Now it’s Mexico’s youth that are paying the price of that duplicity.

Laura Carlsen is a political writer and analyst and the director of the Americas Program of the Center for International Policy. Follow her on Twitter at @cipamericas.

This article was originally published at The Guardian

Reblogged from THINKMEXICAN
A TEXT POST

kenway said: do you have any morel inks about what's happening in mexico? im part of a club at my school where we focus on international affairs and problems and id like to present something about it but i feel like i dont know enough yet

lenmccoy:

yes absolutely

What is happening in Mexico? 

  • How it began

On September 26, students our age (~19-22) were attacked by the local police and gangs in Iguala, Guerrero in Mexico. They were studying to become teachers at Escuela Normal Rural de Ayotzinapa. I have read many articles about how the students were in the town to ask for money to help pay tuition, to protest discrimination of rural school teachers, to travel to commemorate another student massacre of 1986, etc., so I am unsure of what is what here. But the students were on the buses and police blocked their way to get the students out. When they did, they opened fire on the students at once. Some students threw rocks back in self-defense, but the students were unarmed. Six people died and 17 were injured. Three students died, a taxi driver, a woman in a taxi, and a football player that was just 15 years old (x). The injured were taken away by an ambulance, local journalists came, etc but it was not over as more men came in plain clothes and rifles (x). These men are apart of Guerreros Unidos and work for the Beltran Leyva cartel. The students were forced into police vans and have since disappeared. 43 students are missing.

Some of the students escaped by hiding in nearby houses. One terrified student tried running away, but he was found later yet with his eyes gouged out and his face completely sliced away to the bone. A YOUNG MAN only 19 years old suffered through this. (As a warning, be aware that there are photos online and that while searching deep through articles and tags, they are present.) A survivor of the attack says this is “symbol of the cartel assassins” (x).

22 local policemen have been detained for suspicion of working with Guerreros Unidos. This is how authorities were then tipped on what has happened to some students. (x) (x)

  • The Mass Graves

~ More than a week later, on Saturday, authorities found mass graves nearby that has 28 burned remains with the tips (x). We fear that this may be some of the students. We won’t have DNA analysis to confirm anything for another two weeks, if not longer.

image

MORE mass graves were found yesterday, but it is still unknown about how many remains these graves have (x). 

Keep in mind that the CITY MAYOR AND HIS WIFE are on the RUN. No one knows where they are. 

We still don’t understand the reason behind this violence. Why kidnap and kill these young men? There are several explanations online, but how do you explain something like this? One story is that the mayer’s wife was giving a speech that day and did not want to be disrupted by the students. Keep in mind that the wife is the head of the city’s family welfare department and also has family connections to cartels (x). There are other alternatives online, but I don’t know. I just don’t. 

  • You cannot be silent about what is happening in Mexico

You can’t. You just can’t. Social media has a big impact and this story has to spread. In the last 24 hours I have seen an incredible boost in coverage about Ayotzinapa.

On Wednesday, thousands protested the disappearance of the students in Mexico.

image

image

Amounting pressure is being put on the Mexican government to find the missing students. There is also added outrage and demand ‘to punish politicians linked to organized crime’. It is no shock when considering the police corruption and brutality in Mexico. As Mexico bleeds, we all bleed. 

Americans cannot ignore the violence of drug cartels and place it as just a problem in Mexico. There is too much innocent bloodshed. And because BILLIONS AND BILLIONS of dollars are collected in the United States by Mexican drug cartels, it is a shared responsibility (x). CHILDREN ARE DYING. Do not skim over these articles, do not just read them and do nothing, you have to act and spread the information. Do not be silent. Please, please, please help and pay attention. 

ARTICLES

TUMBLR TEXT POSTS (these have better information than I can explain)

If there any corrections that need to be included, please just add them in.

Reblogged from Stephan is the name
A TEXT POST

just so we don’t have another “Coraline was made by Tim Burton” deal on our hands

saccharinescorpion:

The Book of Life

  • is directed by Jorge Gutierrez, creator of of El Tigre. he is the major figure behind the movie, having come up with the idea originally as well
  • is produced by several people, one of whom is Guillermo del Toro, director of Pan’s Labyrinth, Pacific Rim, etc 
  • is written by Jorge Gutierrez, joined by Doug Landale, creator of the Weekenders
  • has several character designs by Sandra Equihua, Gutierrez’s wife and co-creator of El Tigre
Reblogged from Stephan is the name
A PHOTO

revlovejoy:

marxisforbros:

I got 25 out of a possible 50 on this one.

bitter people, prideful scoffers, sin-friendly heresy teachers. hmm ok. MARY-WORSHIPPING CATHOLICS? OH HELL NO

So… everyone is going to hell 

Reblogged from YES YES Y'ALL
A PHOTO

pastel-gizibe:

congenitalprogramming:

pastel-gizibe:

daddynoooo:

myshipshavecannons:

potato-baked:

Girl code

and tilt your head to the side  

Smirk a little

Look him in the eye, look at his junk, and giggle.

Don’t giggle. Men like giggling.

A lot of women resort to giggling while attempting to insult a man out of instinct.

Don’t.

If a man is trying to creep you out and you want to hurt him, fuck off with the giggle. No need to soften the blow. No need to make it cute. If you want to laugh, laugh. Laugh a big, rude, viking’s laugh.

HAR HAR HAR HAR CREEPY FUCKING MAN

VIKING’S LAUGH! HAHAHAHAHA

Reblogged from Tag der Toten